• 100% Social Housing at 58 West Hastings Now!
    Downtown Eastside residents have struggled for over a decade to get the site at 58 W. Hastings for social housing for low-income community members. Led by Indigenous women community organizers, residents and supporters have marched through the streets, organized two tent cities including the 2010 Olympic tent city and 2016 tent city, guided tours with BC's new NDP Minister of Housing and Minister of Social Development and Poverty Reduction, held countless public meetings, demonstrations, and more. About 1,200 homeless people and 3,000 SRO residents live in the Downtown Eastside with no decent housing available for them at rents they can afford. Homeless people have about half the life expectancy of other people in society. Indigenous people, women and children fleeing violence, and other marginalized communities are more likely to experience homelessness. SRO living, where residents share washrooms with everyone on their floor, is not adequate: residents do not have private kitchens, have numerous rodents and bugs, and are often subject to abusive management. SRO residents and homeless people need decent, dignified social housing they can afford. Yet the Mayor and City of Vancouver are planning to reduce the amount of social housing from the promise 100% down to 30%. The plan to build over 200 units of housing in the DTES, with only 70 of them planned to be at welfare/pension rate, is a waste of good housing and further contributes to the gentrification of the DTES. A “social mix” building which includes expensive rentals will exacerbate market pressures on the neighbourhood, create higher rents for SRO residents, and generate the displacement of even more low income people from the DTES. On August 2, 2016, Mayor Gregor Robertson signed a commitment to build 100% welfare and pension rate, community-controlled social housing at 58 W Hastings. Since then, the city has reneged on its promise. Instead of a project that would provide over 300 units to low-income people, the city is moving along with a project that could provide as few as 70 units at a time with record high homelessness. Read more about the Our Homes Can’t Wait Coalition and our community vision for housing on 58 W Hastings here: www.carnegieaction.org/ourhomescantwait/
    275 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Our Homes Can't Wait Picture
  • Refer Bill 62 to the Supreme Court
    Bill 62 is state-sanctioned Islamophobia. It targets Muslim women specifically, and by denying Muslim women wearing the niqab access to public services, the government of Quebec is isolating women and discriminating against them on the basis of their faith. Bill 62 is a slippery slope to religious intolerance that must be struck down. In the 2015 election, Trudeau campaigned in support of Muslim women’s right to wear the niqab. Earlier this year, his government passed a motion condemning Islamophobia. But now, he’s refusing to stand up against this Islamophobic bill. The media already slamming Trudeau’s “Islamophobia hypocrisy”, speculating he’s staying on the sidelines to avoid losing votes in seat-rich Quebec. If thousands of us remind Trudeau of his strong statements against Islamophobia, we can force him to take a stand against Bill 62 -- or look like a hypocrite. [3-4] Sources: [1] https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/10/24/quebec-justice-minister-explains-how-niqab-ban-would-be-applied-after-widespread-criticism.html [2] http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/constitutionality-of-quebec-s-bill-62-difficult-to-defend-legal-expert-says-1.3645585 [3] http://torontosun.com/news/national/bill-62-reveals-trudeaus-islamophobia-hypocrisy [4] http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/althia-raj/the-veil-of-convenience-trudeau-stays-silent-as-quebec-targets-muslims_a_23250365/ *Photo by Matt d'Amours*
    379 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Chloe Lawson
  • Indigenous Languages Need You in Yukon
    Indigenous languages are making a comeback but Canada still doesn’t have legal protections for Indigenous languages. Previous governments took very little action on Indigenous languages, but enough people join this campaign we can get legislation passed that is a true example of building a better relationship. The UNDRIP, TRC Calls to Action, and true reconciliation demands Canadians get active in defending Indigenous languages. Indigenous languages are making a comeback, but our rights are still being denied and just like Residential Schools, present-day schooling doesn’t protect Indigenous languages. ********************* TRC Calls to Actions: 14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles: i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them. ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties. iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation. iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities. v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages. 16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages. ********************* UNDRIP: Article 13 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literature, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places, and persons.
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Martina Volfova
  • Indigenous Languages Need You in British Columbia
    Indigenous languages are making a comeback but Canada still doesn’t have legal protections for Indigenous languages. Previous governments took very little action on Indigenous languages, but enough people join this campaign we can get legislation passed that is a true example of building a better relationship. The UNDRIP, TRC Calls to Action, and true reconciliation demands Canadians get active in defending Indigenous languages. Indigenous languages are making a comeback, but our rights are still being denied and just like Residential Schools, present-day schooling doesn’t protect Indigenous languages. ********************* TRC Calls to Actions: 14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles: i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them. ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties. iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation. iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities. v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages. 16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages. ********************* UNDRIP: Article 13 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literature, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places, and persons.
    880 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Indigenous Languages Speakers Alliance
  • Indigenous Languages Need You in Ontario
    Indigenous languages are making a comeback but Canada still doesn’t have legal protections for Indigenous languages. Previous governments took very little action on Indigenous languages, but enough people join this campaign we can get legislation passed that is a true example of building a better relationship. The UNDRIP, TRC Calls to Action, and true reconciliation demands Canadians get active in defending Indigenous languages. Indigenous languages are making a comeback, but our rights are still being denied and just like Residential Schools, present-day schooling doesn’t protect Indigenous languages. ********************* TRC Calls to Actions: 14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles: i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them. ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties. iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation. iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities. v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages. 16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages. ********************* UNDRIP: Article 13 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literature, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places, and persons.
    201 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Indigenous Languages Speakers Alliance
  • Indigenous Languages Need You in Manitoba
    Indigenous languages are making a comeback but Canada still doesn’t have legal protections for Indigenous languages. Previous governments took very little action on Indigenous languages, but enough people join this campaign we can get legislation passed that is a true example of building a better relationship. The UNDRIP, TRC Calls to Action, and true reconciliation demands Canadians get active in defending Indigenous languages. Indigenous languages are making a comeback, but our rights are still being denied and just like Residential Schools, present-day schooling doesn’t protect Indigenous languages. ********************* TRC Calls to Actions: 14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles: i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them. ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties. iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation. iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities. v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages. 16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages. ********************* UNDRIP: Article 13 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literature, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places, and persons.
    24 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Indigenous Languages Speakers Alliance
  • Indigenous Languages Need You in Alberta
    Indigenous languages are making a comeback but Canada still doesn’t have legal protections for Indigenous languages. Previous governments took very little action on Indigenous languages, but enough people join this campaign we can get legislation passed that is a true example of building a better relationship. The UNDRIP, TRC Calls to Action, and true reconciliation demands Canadians get active in defending Indigenous languages. Indigenous languages are making a comeback, but our rights are still being denied and just like Residential Schools, present-day schooling doesn’t protect Indigenous languages. ********************* TRC Calls to Actions: 14. We call upon the federal government to enact an Aboriginal Languages Act that incorporates the following principles: i. Aboriginal languages are a fundamental and valued element of Canadian culture and society, and there is an urgency to preserve them. ii. Aboriginal language rights are reinforced by the Treaties. iii. The federal government has a responsibility to provide sufficient funds for Aboriginal-language revitalization and preservation. iv. The preservation, revitalization, and strengthening of Aboriginal languages and cultures are best managed by Aboriginal people and communities. v. Funding for Aboriginal language initiatives must reflect the diversity of Aboriginal languages. 16. We call upon post-secondary institutions to create university and college degree and diploma programs in Aboriginal languages. ********************* UNDRIP: Article 13 1. Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literature, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places, and persons.
    62 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Indigenous Languages Speakers Alliance
  • Protégez les sources d'eau au Québec - Protect water sources in Quebec
    Si les gouvernements sont incapables de s’assurer que l’activité industrielle n’impacte pas les sources essentielles d’eau potable, le bien-être des populations locales est mis à risque. Le petit village de Ristigouche Sud-est au Québec fait face à une poursuite contre une pétrolière pour vouloir protéger son eau potable. Gastem, une pétrolière Montréalaise, poursuit Ristigouche Sud-Est pour avoir passé une loi interdisant le forage du pétrole près de leur source principale d’eau potable. [1] Si Ristigouche Sud-est perd le procès, qui se déroule au cours des deux prochaines semaines, ils auraient à payer 1,5 $ million en dommages – un montant 5 fois supérieur à leur budget annuel. [2] Nous avons besoin de règlements plus stricts au Québec concernant le forage du pétrole et du gaz près des sources d’eau potable. Nous appelons le gouvernement du Québec à mettre en place des règlements plus stricts afin d’assurer la protection des sources d’eau des intérêts corporatistes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- If governments are unable to prevent industrial activity from impacting vital water sources, the water that that sustains the lives of local people is at risk. The small village of Ristigouche Sud-Est in Quebec is being sued by an oil and gas company for trying to protect their water. Gastem, a Montreal based oil-and-gas exploration and development company is suing Ristigouche Sud-Est for passing a bylaw establishing a no drill zone near their main source of water. [1] If Ristigouche Sud-Est loses the trial, which is happening right now, they could be forced to pay up to $1.5 million in damages - which is more than 5 times their annual budget. [2] Municipalities should not be punished for passing laws to protect their water. We need stricter regulations in Quebec on oil and gas drilling near water sources. We are calling on the government of Quebec to implement stricter regulations and ensure that vital water sources are protected from corporate interests. Sources: [1] [2] http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ristigouche-gastem-oil-gas-lawsuit-1.4276727
    3,855 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Deborah Smith
  • Save Fish Lake
    In a shocking move, on the eve of the transfer of power, while four of six Tsilhqot’in communities are evacuated due to raging wildfires, and while the communities have engaged in brave efforts to fight for their very survival, the Clark led British Columbian government has granted controversial drilling permits over the objections of the Tsilhqot’in. The Nation is outraged that the BC Ministry of Energy and Mines has issued permits to allow Taseko Mines Ltd. to conduct extensive pre-construction exploration for the New Prosperity mine proposal. This mine cannot be built. It was rejected twice by the Harper-era Federal Government in 2010 (Prosperity) and 2014 (New Prosperity) due to strong opposition by the Tsilhqot’in Nation and unacceptable environmental and cultural impacts. Chief Russell Myers Ross- “I am speechless at the timing of this insulting decision. It defies compassion that while our people are fighting for our homes and lives, BC issues permits that will destroy more of our land beyond repair. As a Nation, we have wasted enough time and energy in conflict. The project has been rejected twice federally. It is time to move on. As Tsilhqot'in, we are moving forward by establishing the Dasiqox Tribal Park based on our governance and values. The Provincial decision to permit further drilling is insulting. It demonstrates a serious attack on meaningful reconciliation. It is our responsibility to protect Nabas for our future generations.” Chief Joe Alphonse- "This is a typical move by the Liberal government. They are a dead political party trying to mount a dead horse and hoping to ride it to a come back." To learn more watch this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwjCeWF4rfM
    8,381 of 9,000 Signatures
    Created by Tsilhqot'in National Government
  • Grow Our Grassways
    This petition is designed to bring awareness to housing constraints within the Jane and Finch area, specifically The Grassways. We are not disputing the upsetting occurrences of relocation brought upon other communities who are facing - or have already been through - this experience; rather, we are trying to bring awareness to the situation on a micro level with hopes of later expanding into a larger platform. Most Ontarian's are aware of the rapid increase in the housing market however very little attention is brought to the areas that are being forced give up their homes to pave the way for new development. The new developments are problematic because they generally are very expensive and drive up the cost of living, making affordable housing accommodations inaccessible to residents. With this petition, we invite community members that are affected by the relocation to join our newly established "Grow Our Grassways" tenant board. Currently, there are no promises of return being established with residents of the Grassways because there is no development opportunity. However, we realize that once the units are emptied, that will change. Therefore, we demand that the City of Toronto and Toronto Community Housing consult our board and include us in consultations regarding the new development. We need to guarantee that the Grassways are memorialized by the city by honoring the long and rich history of the community. For example: the ‘Towards a Higher Journey Mural’ needs to be preserved, community arts (e.g. photograph series, youths arts and crafts, farewell BBQ) must be held to assist members in saying good-bye to their community, their family, and their friends. We have questions for the city that must be answered such as; what will happen to the recreational center and it’s after school programs? How will the new developments help the youth and families in the Jane and Finch area? Will we be displaced and disposed? A similar situation happened to the Regent Park community and we want to prevent it from happening to ours. Please sign our petition to help bring awareness to our crisis in order to prevent our families from losing their homes and hopefully to prevent other communities from being forced out of their neighborhoods as well. We want our government to live up to their promise of helping low-income families and neighborhoods. We want the government to keep their initial promise of reviving our neighborhood and not demolishing it. We need to GROW our Grassways not diminish it. Demands: -Establishment of a Grow Our Grassways tenant board to be consulted for the new development -Despite there being no current development opportunity, a Promise of Return must be established for current residents Community arts (ex. Photograph series, arts and crafts, farewell BBQ) must be held to give space for community members to say goodbye to their neighborhood, the Grassways -Towards A Higher Journey Mural (currently located on 7 Blue Grassway) must be preserved and have a space in any new development plan -The Grassways needs to be memorialized by the City, there is a long and rich history of community mobilization that must be archived and made accessible to the public
    137 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Shannon Holness
  • Return Kinder Morgan's donations
    Kinder Morgan and their backers donated more than $771,000 to the BC Liberals, before Christy Clark approved their TransMountain pipeline. With an election just weeks away, the BC Liberals want the political donation scandal to end. If enough of us sign the open letter, we can force them to choose: Return Kinder Morgan's money, or watch this scandal continue to grow.
    172 of 200 Signatures
  • Stop Woodfibre LNG
    Howe Sound is magical. Visitors and locals alike are drawn here by its wild natural beauty, recreational opportunities, and the vibrant communities we call home. However, Howe Sound is under threat from Woodfibre LNG, which proposes to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility on the previous Woodfibre Pulp and Paper Mill site located approximately 7 km west-southwest of Squamish. Why is Woodfibre LNG a problem? The project is owned by Sukanto Tanoto, an Indonesian billionaire that has been found guilty of tax evasion and human rights violations. LNG tanker traffic puts Howe Sound residents, Vancouver residents, and Victoria residents at risk, and the potential conflict between recreational sailors and LNG tankers has not been adequately addressed. Increased local air pollution will affect human health, particularly the elderly and kids with asthma. Underwater noise and light pollution will affect salmon migration routes, herring, and marine mammals. Locally, Woodfibre LNG will create nearly double the greenhouse gas emissions of all of Squamish. Woodfibre LNG's local and upstream greenhouse gas emissions are equivalent to adding 170,000 cars to the road. If Woodfibre LNG goes ahead, it will result in 24 new fracking wells per year in northeast B.C. My Sea to Sky is aiming to double the number of signatures we have on the Howe Sound Declaration by March 31st, so we can make Woodfibre LNG a provincial election issue. Please sign the Howe Sound Declaration now and ask your friends and family to sign too.
    11,117 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Tracey Saxby