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To: indigenous information network

Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act,

Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act,

will Friday return to court as joint amicus curiae in the case where Dr wako prof, guyo jaldesa as the Petitioner, is challenging the constitutional validity of the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act, simply known as the Anti-FGM Act.

Why is this important?

WHO IS AT RISK?
More than 3 million girls are estimated to be at risk for FGM annually. More than 200 million girls and women alive today have been cut in 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and west where FGM is concentrated. The practice is most common in the Western, Eastern, and North-Eastern regions of Africa, in some countries the Middle East and west as well as among migrants from these areas. FGM is therefore a global concern.
FGM is recognized Marsabit County as a violation of the human rights of girls and women. It reflects deep-rooted inequality between the sexes, and constitutes an extreme form of discrimination against women. It is nearly always carried out on minors and is a violation of the rights of children.
Types of female genital mutilation
Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.
In 1997, WHO classified female genital mutilation into four different types? Since then, experience with using this classification revealed the need to subdivide these categories, to capture the varieties of FGM in more detail. Severity (which here corresponds to the amount of tissue damaged) and health risk are closely related to the type of FGM performed as well as the amount of tissue that is cut.
The four major types of FGM, and their subtypes, are:
Type I. Partial or total removal of the clitoral glans (the external and visible part of the clitoris, which is a sensitive part of the female genitals, with the function of providing sexual pleasure to the woman), and/or the prepuce/clitoral hood (the fold of skin surrounding the clitoral glans). When it is important to distinguish between the major variations of Type I FGM, the following subdivisions are used:
Type Ia. Removal of the prepuce/clitoral hood only.
Type Ib. Removal of the clitoral glans with the prepuce/clitoral hood.
Type II. Partial or total removal of the clitoral glans and the labia minora (the inner folds of the vulva), with or without removal of the labia majora (the outer folds of skin of the vulva). When it is important to distinguish between the major variations of Type II FGM, the following subdivisions are used:
Type IIa. Removal of the labia minora only.
Type IIb. Partial or total removal of the clitoral glans and the labia minora (prepuce/clitoral hood may be affected).
Type IIc. Partial or total removal of the clitoral glans, the labia minora and the labia majora (prepuce/clitoral hood may be affected).
Type III. (Often referred to as infibulation). Narrowing of the vaginal opening with the creation of a covering seal. The seal is formed by cutting and repositioning the labia minora, or labia majora. The covering of the vaginal opening is done with or without removal of the clitoral prepuce/clitoral hood and glans (Type I FGM). When it is important to distinguish between variations of Type III FGM, the following subdivisions are used:
Type IIIa. Removal and repositioning of the labia minora.
Type IIIb. Removal and repositioning of the labia majora.

Type IV. All other harmful procedures to the female genitalia for non-medical purposes, for example pricking, piercing, incising, scraping and cauterization.
Deinfibulation refers to the practice of cutting open the sealed vaginal opening of a woman who has been infibulated (Type III). This is often done to allow sexual intercourse or to facilitate childbirth, and is often necessary for improving the woman’s health and well-being.
Despite the health risks, some women undergo a narrowing of their vaginal opening again after being deinfibulated, at the time of childbirth – meaning that they may undergo a series of repeated infibulations and deinfibulations throughout the life-course.


Reasons for signing

  • women fight against HIV in Kenya international of community living with HIV in North America

Updates

2020-07-08 07:41:46 -0400

Increased understanding among the people on the grassroots women development policies and strategies.
Impart knowledge on the process of effective communication with key publics.
Promote an effective approach to the use of radio and television as tools for county Development.

2020-07-08 07:33:46 -0400

community has support in provision of basic services to the most needy in society. This includes social safety nets for the elderly, the very poor and orphaned, free primary education,and access to health services.

2020-07-08 07:24:09 -0400

there has been a shift in consciousness — gender-based violence against women is now broadly recognized as an injustice against women — but there has not been an adequate shift in practice to end violence against women.

2020-07-08 07:21:59 -0400

In Global fund proposal writing team as community mobilize we need to lobby to have campaign day examples- This 16-day period also highlights other significant dates including 8th March International women day, November 29, International Women Human Rights Defenders Day; December 1, World AIDS Day; and December 6, which marks the Anniversary of the human being worldwide. We still find ourselves struggling against the same things, fighting the same fight, and continuing to demand dignity, autonomy, and justice.

2020-07-08 07:19:14 -0400

We need to have outreach teams increased their community awareness-raising activities, explaining what sexual and gender-based violence and document as evidence.

2020-07-08 07:16:26 -0400

We write a letter to President Uhuru Kenyatta has been commended for spearheading the national campaign to end Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in Kenya and the region.
The visiting Vice President of the Republic of Liberia Jewel Taylor applauded President Kenyatta for mobilizing opinion leaders including elders in the country to make a commitment to end FGM in Kenya by 2022.
President Kenyatta last week met religious and cultural leaders drawn from 22 counties who signed a declaration to eliminate FGM by 2022.
The Liberian VP, who is in the country to attend the ongoing International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD25), spoke today when she paid a courtesy call on President Kenyatta at State House, Nairobi.

2020-07-08 07:11:44 -0400

we have zoom meeting of way forward
Social Mobilization - Engagement and mobilization of communities for healthy behaviour change and practices;
Capacity building & development of communication tools, packages - IEC materials and health messages

2020-07-08 07:09:55 -0400

Advocacy - Lobbying and support for key health issues by engaging decision makers in national & county government, Civil Society, Partners & Stakeholders on health clusters
Communication - Strategy and Management; Internal & external communication; Media Relations; Interpersonal communication; Risk Communication; Health Campaigns
Social Mobilization - Engagement and mobilization of communities for healthy behaviour change and practices;
Capacity building & development of communication tools, packages - IEC materials and health messages

2020-07-08 07:08:47 -0400

Friday return to court as joint amicus curiae in the case where Dr wako prof, guyo jaldesa as the Petitioner, is challenging the constitutional validity of the Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act, simply known as the Anti-FGM Act.